Cactus Blog Archives

Cactus Blog Writers

Peter Lipson
Hap Hollibaugh

Cactus Art


St. Olaf College has some cactus art.<br /><br />There is only so much we can do when writing sentences like that last one. It is full of information, densely packed tight, and yet I have no idea what it could mean. Shall I read the article to find out what it means? Or pass over it and regain a few minutes of my life lost to the reading of that enigmatic sentence.<br /><br />Well, here it is if you should care to find out more, after the break…<br /><br /><br /><a href="https://cactusjungle.com/archives/blog/archives/1684-guid.html#extended">Continue reading "Cactus Art"</a>

Read More...
Read More...

California Aloe


<img width="324" hspace="5" height="432" border="2" src="/blog/uploads/cactus/oxford01.jpg" /><br /><br />Oxford Street<br />Aloe arborescens – these are in bloom all over town now.<br /><br />

Read More...
Read More...

Fewer Peyote Plants in the Wild


Legal Texas peyote is disappearing faster than you can say, &quot;peccary.&quot; The <a href="https://cactusjungle.com/archives/blog/exit.php?url_id=1861&amp;entry_id=1682" title="http://www.dallasobserver.com/2008-02-14/news/texas-peyote-hunters-struggle-to-find-a-vanishing-holy-crop" onmouseover="window.status=’http://www.dallasobserver.com/2008-02-14/news/texas-peyote-hunters-struggle-to-find-a-vanishing-holy-crop’;return true;" onmouseout="window.status=”;return true;">Dallas Observer</a> reports:<br /><br style="font-style: italic;" /><div style="margin-left: 40px;"><img width="150" hspace="5" height="180" border="2" src="/blog/uploads/misc/1896260.51.jpg" /><br style="font-style: italic;" /><span style="font-style: italic;">Harvesting peyote is legal for only three people, and all of them live in Texas…<br />
<br />
Cactus spines and the occasional rattle snake are all in a day’s work for Mauro Morales, one of three legal peyote hunters in Texas….<br />
<br />
&quot;I used to collect as much in a week as I now do in a month,&quot; he says. &quot;I don’t know what’s going to happen to the medicine.&quot;<br />
<br />
Morales almost never utters the word &quot;peyote.&quot; For him, the small green-gray cactus is a sacrament with miraculous healing powers, hence his word for it: medicine. </span><br /></div><br />

Read More...
Read More...

Canadian Cactus


All the way from <a href="https://cactusjungle.com/archives/blog/exit.php?url_id=1860&amp;entry_id=1681" title="http://www.canada.com/theprovince/news/letters/story.html?id=c4778f3b-3609-438e-ad5a-a3167c553203" onmouseover="window.status=’http://www.canada.com/theprovince/news/letters/story.html?id=c4778f3b-3609-438e-ad5a-a3167c553203′;return true;" onmouseout="window.status=”;return true;">Canada.com</a> comes this travel letter. I don’t know why.<br /><br /><div style="margin-left: 40px;"><span style="font-style: italic;">While we enjoyed Tecate beer on the patio, we looked out at… (t)he prickly vegetation in the desert… the land of the giant cactus. Some were unbelievable, reaching several storeys high.</span><br /></div><br />Sometimes I look out my window and see all the stuff my neighbor with OCD is storing in his small front fenced-in patio.<br /><br />

Read More...
Read More...

Link of the Day


<a href="https://cactusjungle.com/archives/blog/exit.php?url_id=1859&amp;entry_id=1680" title="http://fosteroutdoors.blogspot.com/2008/02/nature-no-pork-here.html" onmouseover="window.status=’http://fosteroutdoors.blogspot.com/2008/02/nature-no-pork-here.html’;return true;" onmouseout="window.status=”;return true;">Jim Foster Outdoors</a> writes about the javelina, a pig-like peccary from Texas. Now, he does talk about hunting them, so you may not actually want to click through. But javelinas and cactus do go together like Martin and Lewis, or Belushi and Ackroyd, or McCain and Bush or another comedy team you can think up for yourself.<br /><br /><div style="margin-left: 40px;"><span style="font-style: italic;">The javelina lives in the brushy semi-desert where prickly pear cactus is a conspicuous part of the flora. They are commonly found in dense thickets of prickly pear, chaparral, scrub oak, or guajillo.</span><br /></div><br />

Read More...
Read More...

North Carolina Cactus


Some people just have too many cactus, even if they live in Fayetteville, NC and write for the <a href="https://cactusjungle.com/archives/blog/exit.php?url_id=1858&amp;entry_id=1679" title="http://www.fayobserver.com/article?id=285055" onmouseover="window.status=’http://www.fayobserver.com/article?id=285055′;return true;" onmouseout="window.status=”;return true;">Fayetteville Observer</a>.<br /><br style="font-style: italic;" /><div style="margin-left: 40px;"><img width="250" hspace="5" height="329" border="2" src="/blog/uploads/misc/20se10209dsc-scaled.jpg" /><br style="font-style: italic;" /><span style="font-style: italic;">Photo by Roger Mercer<br />
This crested form of Lemairocereus thunbergii probably will never bloom, but the plant’s brown bristles and contorted growth make it delightfully decorative.<br />
<br />
I grew almost 4,000 cacti and more than 1,000 species of cacti and succulents. That was before I moved from a house with two greenhouses to a house with none.</span><br /></div><br />Good Grief.<br /><br />

Read More...
Read More...

Drought Conditions


<a href="https://cactusjungle.com/archives/blog/exit.php?url_id=1857&amp;entry_id=1678" title="http://www.diyclick.com/2008/02/how-to-have-beautiful-spring-garden.html" onmouseover="window.status=’http://www.diyclick.com/2008/02/how-to-have-beautiful-spring-garden.html’;return true;" onmouseout="window.status=”;return true;">DIY is featuring</a> some help in planting for drought conditions, and recommends native cacti and succulents. However they don’t say where they are native to. No matter, low-water plants of all types are good during drought. Except today, when it’s raining. And tomorrow, and the day after that, too. It looks like at least another week of rain here.<br /><br /><div style="margin-left: 40px;"><span style="font-style: italic;">Many of our own native plants, water-storing cactus and succulents for example, have evolved over time to tolerate dry conditions… Often they display one or more adaptations, including deep taproots or shallow but wide-reaching root systems to maximize the chance of finding water, gray green waxy or hairy leaf coverings, or reduced leaf surface to cut down on water loss through transpiration.<br />
<br />
Prudent gardeners select companion plants with similar water needs… The trick is to keep young plants watered during the first two to four weeks while they become established, and after that they will be fine.</span><br /></div><br />So that’s how you do it.<br /><br />

Read More...
Read More...

Agave Fencerow


From the Smithsonian Institution, Department of Botany, Plant Image Collection<br /><br /><img width="432" hspace="5" border="2" src="/blog/uploads/cactus/rah01306.jpg" /><br /><br />Agave americana variegata (Agavaceae)<br />
Photo by R.A. Howard, Courtesy of Smithsonian Institution.<br /><br />

Read More...
Read More...

It's Time for a Poll


<script type="text/javascript" language="javascript" src="http://s3.polldaddy.com/p/331181.js"></script><noscript> &lt;a href =&quot;http://www.polldaddy.com&quot; &gt;surveys&lt;/a&gt; – &lt;a href =&quot;http://www.polldaddy.com/p/331181/&quot; &gt;Take Our Poll&lt;/a&gt; </noscript><br /><br />

Read More...
Read More...

Saguaro


Aunt Rachel sends us this photo of a wobbly-armed Saguaro on their travels in Arizona.<br /><br /><img width="432" hspace="5" height="325" border="2" src="/blog/uploads/cactus/AZ3006.jpg" /><br /><br />

Read More...
Read More...

Agave Blooms


From the Smithsonian Institution, Department of Botany, Plant Image Collection.<br /><br /><img width="320" hspace="5" height="480" border="2" src="/blog/uploads/cactus/rah00072.jpg" /><br /><br />Agave schidigera (Agavaceae)<br />
Photo by R.A. Howard, Courtesy of Smithsonian Institution.<br /><br />

Read More...
Read More...

Housing Market Tales of Woe


The market is so shot, they’re featuring cactus gardens to try to sell a house. <a href="https://cactusjungle.com/archives/blog/exit.php?url_id=1854&amp;entry_id=1672" title="http://www.coldwellbanker.com/servlet/PropertyListing?action=detail&ComColdwellbankerDataProperty_id=13036366&page=property" onmouseover="window.status=’http://www.coldwellbanker.com/servlet/PropertyListing?action=detail&ComColdwellbankerDataProperty_id=13036366&page=property’;return true;" onmouseout="window.status=”;return true;">Coldwell Banker</a> has this listing in Ojai for $6.25m.<br /><br /><div style="margin-left: 40px;"><span style="font-style: italic;">A 1908 Myron Hunt Design. This is the historical winter home of Edward Drummond Libbey, the visionary philanthropist who transformed Ojai from a ramshackle western settlement into the modern architectural mecca it is today. A prosperous glass manufacturer, Libbey wintered in Ojai beginning in 1908. He is responsible for the original Wallace Neff clubhouse and the George C. Thomas, Jr. golf course of the Ojai Valley Inn and Country Club…. Myron Hunt, the renowned Los Angeles architect responsible for the Huntington Library, the Ambassador Hotel and many buildings at Caltech, Occidental College and Pomona College, designed the Libbey Estate in 1908…. Located on Foothill Road near downtown Ojai, the estate features three separate houses, an office, a recently built 60 foot tile pool <span style="font-weight: bold;">and extensive cactus and succulent gardens.</span> The property totals 3.7 acres</span><br /></div><br />Nice. A little pricey, but you’d get a lot for your money.<br /><br />

Read More...
Read More...

We Get Broken Aloe Questions


Q: Hi,<br />
We had a misfortune today with our Aloe plicatilis that we purchased from you guys. We came home and it had broken from the pot. The root and part of the trunk is still attached in the potted soil. I placed it in water, but I am not sure if it will survive!!!<br />
Please help!<br />
Thank you<br />
Tanya<br /><br />A: Tanya,<br />
<br />
I am sorry to hear your Aloe is damaged, hopefully it can be saved. Please take it out of the water, succulents like to be dry when healing from an injury.<br />
<br />
Let it dry off and clean any part of the stem that is broken with household Hydrogen-Peroxide. Give it a week or two in a warm dry place and re-pot in dry soil. You can use a stake to hold in upright while it regrows roots. It may take a few months to grow new roots. Do not water for two to three weeks after replanting.<br />
<br />
You can also bring it buy the nursery and we will see what we can do to speed it on its way to recovery.<br />
<br />
Take care,<br />
Hap<br /><br />

Read More...
Read More...

Link of the Day


<a href="https://cactusjungle.com/archives/blog/exit.php?url_id=1850&amp;entry_id=1669" title="http://www.apartmenttherapy.com/sf/flower-box-awards/sf-flower-box-award-rand-at-wickson-oakland-043078" onmouseover="window.status=’http://www.apartmenttherapy.com/sf/flower-box-awards/sf-flower-box-award-rand-at-wickson-oakland-043078′;return true;" onmouseout="window.status=”;return true;">Apartment Therapy</a> has some great photos of a cactus and succulent garden in Oakland. Now why didn’t I find that garden and take pictures of it? A friend has a garden right around the corner, and nobody ever told me about this one. Hmmpph.<br /><br />

Read More...
Read More...

They get Fungus Questions


The Worthington Daily Globe (ND) gets questions about fungi. We should all get questions about fungi. I like questions about fungi, how about you?

Q: I have a home outside of Palm Springs, Calif. Several years ago, I purchased a couple of cactus plants on a lark…. 

In the past few months, I have noticed… one plant… has tan/brown ringlike circles on three ridges. There is one lone circle at the base and the rest are at the top. Is there something that I should be doing to prevent further destruction?

Oddly enough, I did not expect to find a cactus resource hosted by someone in North Dakota. I have never visited your campus, but my brother-in-law is a member of the football coaching staff.

A: You have a home in Palm Springs and a brother-in-law on our Bison football coaching staff. What a nicely tangled web…. I suspect, from what you have told me, that your cactus might have a systemic fungus infection. If you could send some photos, it would make my guess more certain.

Yes, it’s true, photos do help. Did you know that the Bush Administration is planning on shooting down a failing satellite with unproven star-wars technology? Experts scoff at the idea.

Read More...
Read More...

My Latest Instructional Video


<object width="425" height="350"><param name="movie" value="http://www.youtube.com/v/tAW-ARr2Zk4&rel=1"></param><embed width="425" height="350" adblockframename="adblock-frame-n7" adblockframedobject2="true" adblockframedobject="true" src="http://www.youtube.com/v/tAW-ARr2Zk4&rel=1" type="application/x-shockwave-flash"/object><br /><br /><br /><a href="https://cactusjungle.com/archives/blog/archives/1668-guid.html#extended">Continue reading "My Latest Instructional Video"</a>

Read More...
Read More...

Link of the Day


<a href="https://cactusjungle.com/archives/blog/exit.php?url_id=1848&amp;entry_id=1666" title="http://madeinmississippi.blogspot.com/2008/02/savoring-spanish-succulent.html" onmouseover="window.status=’http://madeinmississippi.blogspot.com/2008/02/savoring-spanish-succulent.html’;return true;" onmouseout="window.status=”;return true;">Made in Mississippi</a> visits the cacti of Spain and falls in love. Pictures and printmaking follow.<br /><br /><br />

Read More...
Read More...

Friday Whippet Blogging


<a href="https://cactusjungle.com/archives/blog/exit.php?url=aHR0cDovL3d3dy5hcGFydG1lbnR0aGVyYXB5LmNvbS9zZi9wbGFudHMtZmxvd2Vycy9jYWN0dXMtanVuZ2xlLTA0MjA0Nw==&amp;entry_id=1634" title="http://www.apartmenttherapy.com/sf/plants-flowers/cactus-jungle-042047" onmouseover="window.status=’http://www.apartmenttherapy.com/sf/plants-flowers/cactus-jungle-042047′;return true;" onmouseout="window.status=”;return true;">Apartment Therapy</a> came by and took this picture of Benjamin relaxing in the sun on a cold day.<br /><br /><img width="405" hspace="5" height="540" border="2" src="/blog/uploads/whippets/2-520cactus3.jpg" /><br /><br />Photo by Shayna Roosevelt<br /><br />

Read More...
Read More...

They Get Questions


The Las Vegas Review Journal takes questions from their readers about cactus. Good deal all around.

I have a question about my cacti. They have been wilted or thin for about 8 months. I bought them in October 2006 and planted them in the ground. Then, about March 2007, I placed them into containers…. They were wilting somewhat before I replanted them. 

What is wrong with them? Do they have a fungus? Also, I forgot what kind of cactus they are.

A: Your cacti do look pretty bad. All of the pads are shriveled like flattened raisins. Cacti like this are usually suffering from water stress: not applying water often enough.

It also can be a sign of root or pad rot developing below ground. Keeping a soil too moist can rot roots and the pad below ground. That, too, is water stress since there are not enough roots for the cactus to bring water to the pads.

These problems are remedied by making sure the soil you use drains easily after irrigating and scheduling your irrigations less frequently.

If the pads and roots appear to be healthy, then the plants are, most likely, not getting watered often enough. Water plants in the ground less often than the same plants growing in containers. The smaller the container, the more often you will need to water. If those same plants were in small containers like yours, I would be watering them every couple of days.

Now, there’s a lot more if you follow the link. It’s quite the extensive discussion of water stress in cacti in Nevada.

 

Read More...
Read More...

Grand Rapids Succulents


The Fredrerick Meijer Gardens and Sculpture Park in Grand Rapids, MI had a christmas show recently and used our photo of our succulent wreaths on one of their banners.<br /><br /><img width="288" hspace="5" height="432" border="0" src="/blog/uploads/misc/meijer_wreath.JPG" /><br /><br />It’s very nice indeed. I hope all you Michiganders (I voted for Michiganians, <a href="https://cactusjungle.com/archives/blog/exit.php?url_id=1847&amp;entry_id=1665" title="http://www.micaucus.com/michigan_caucus/2006/12/from_wiki_michi.html" onmouseover="window.status=’http://www.micaucus.com/michigan_caucus/2006/12/from_wiki_michi.html’;return true;" onmouseout="window.status=”;return true;">but I lost</a>) get to visit the park this spring.<br /><br />The park is well known for their modern art collection. I like the di Suvero and the beautiful Goldsworthy arch.<br /><br />

Read More...
Read More...

Link of the Day


Nice succulent garden photos by <a href="https://cactusjungle.com/archives/blog/exit.php?url_id=1844&amp;entry_id=1662" title="http://www.epiforums.com/showpost.php?p=22055&postcount=1" onmouseover="window.status=’http://www.epiforums.com/showpost.php?p=22055&postcount=1′;return true;" onmouseout="window.status=”;return true;">jjk on the EpiForums</a>. Seems to be from a community college in Honolulu. Nice Pachypodium specimens, Alluaudias, and blooming Agave attenuatas plus much more.<br /><br /><br />

Read More...
Read More...

Hawaii Succulent in the News


Tourists flock to the state for the gardens. This article comes direct from the source, <a href="https://cactusjungle.com/archives/blog/exit.php?url_id=1846&amp;entry_id=1664" title="http://www.summitpacificinc.com/2008/02/kauais-north-shore-is-horticultural.html" onmouseover="window.status=’http://www.summitpacificinc.com/2008/02/kauais-north-shore-is-horticultural.html’;return true;" onmouseout="window.status=”;return true;">Kauai News</a>. I think they want you to print this article in your own local paper, to generate more tourists for the state.<br /><br /><div style="margin-left: 40px;"><span style="font-style: italic;">The Na ‘Aina Kai Botanical Gardens in Kilauea doubles in dramatic man-made landscaping and horticulture….<br />
<br />
Had we been magically transported to the Sahara? I wouldn’t think a cactus could survive all the rain and moisture on Kauai’s north shore. But a huge array of succulents and cacti from around the world seemed to thrive in the artificially arid conditions.</span><br /></div><br />That’s all. Not much going on, I guess.<br /><br />

Read More...
Read More...

Chicago Succulents


The <a href="https://cactusjungle.com/archives/blog/exit.php?url_id=1845&amp;entry_id=1663" title="http://www.dailyherald.com/story/?id=125845" onmouseover="window.status=’http://www.dailyherald.com/story/?id=125845′;return true;" onmouseout="window.status=”;return true;">Chicago Daily Herald</a> (never heard of them) says you should plant some pretty succulents together in a mixed pot, and then you’re an artist! Woohoo!<br /><br /><div style="margin-left: 40px;"><span style="font-style: italic;"><span style="font-weight: bold;">Plants as Art</span><br /><img width="200" hspace="5" border="2" align="left" src="/blog/uploads/misc/42399.jpg" /> Rita Randolph could probably make a beautiful container with dandelions….<br />
<br />
Gardeners striving to be container artists can learn a lot from her.<br />
<br />
Her multitude of planters range from those featuring mother-in-law’s tongue to edibles, succulents, grasses, vines and monochromatic selections….<br />
<br />
If you never thought of mother-in-law’s tongue as a beauty, you haven’t followed Randolph’s advice:<br />
<br />
&quot;It needs friends. It’s always stuck in the back of a container.&quot;</span><br /></div><br />You know, journalism is very different than blogging. They write these articles, and we leach off them for our blogs. They write about bizarre things like how using sansevieria makes a planter into art, and I post them for you. I guess what I’m trying to say is that they’re sincere and I’m not.<br /><br /><br />

Read More...
Read More...

We Get ID Questions


An interesting mystery:<br /><br />Q: Hi! <br />
Bumped into your website today, and saw that you answer cactus/succulent questions, so I figured maybe you could help me ID this plant. It’s a seedling that is growing in the pot with my haworthia. It was already in the pot when I bought the haworthia a year ago, so all I know is that it’s over a year old. When I got it, the seedling was, I think, less than half an inch tall. It had two small round leaves at the very bottom (would those be cotelydons?), and one of them is still there, but the other fell off. No other leaves or spines though. Now it’s a bit under two inches tall, and it did most of the growing in the summer. I don’t know how to describe the plant, besides that it’s flat, so I attached two pictures. I also dug it out a while back, to see what kind of roots it has, and it pretty much has just one root that goes straight down, about half an inch long. Not much in terms of small rootage. It seems to do fine with the same light and watering that the haworthia gets, but then I have no idea what it is and what it’s supposed to look like… For all I know it was supposed to be 10′ tall by now, and all covered in deadly spines or huge pink flowers. Or deadly pink flowers. Or something.<br />
Do you know what it could be?<br />
Thanks in advance!<br />
-Lena<br /><br /><img width="324" hspace="5" height="432" border="2" src="/blog/uploads/misc/plant_id_1.jpg" /><br /><br />A: Lena,<br />
I love cool mysteries! But I have to say I am not sure if I can help you. My best wild guess is perhaps it is a Pedilanthus of some sort, perhaps one of the Pedilanthus tithymaloides sub species. Perhaps it will get some sort of leaf or bloom in the spring and we can try again.<br />
<br />
Hap<br /><br />

Read More...
Read More...

Link of the Day


The latest picture from the <a href="https://cactusjungle.com/archives/blog/exit.php?url_id=1842&amp;entry_id=1660" title="http://www.humanflowerproject.com/index.php/weblog/learning_to_read_the_la_landscape/" onmouseover="window.status=’http://www.humanflowerproject.com/index.php/weblog/learning_to_read_the_la_landscape/’;return true;" onmouseout="window.status=”;return true;">Human Flower Project</a> features the Huntington Gardens.<br /><div style="margin-left: 40px;"><br /><img width="400" hspace="5" border="2" src="/blog/uploads/misc/jill-la-jack450.jpg" /></div><div style="margin-left: 40px;"><span style="font-style: italic;">Jack Nokes, el mero chofer, relaxes in the cacti and succulent gardens at the Huntington<br />
Photo: Jill Nokes<br /><br /></span></div>

Read More...
Read More...

We Get Questions


Q: Hello- Do you carry a form of cactus called a “forever flower” it has small pink flowers oval leaves and grows tall and skinny. If you are familiar I would like to know the full scientific name and where they are from. If you can help out with these info. that would be great.

thanks for your time.

Kendra

A: Kendra,

I am not familiar with “Forever Flower” as a common name, however from

your description I am guessing you are talking about Euphorbia milli, a

very cool succulent native to Madagascar. It is in the family

Euphorbiaceae, so it is not a cactus, but a similar looking succulent.

There are a number of hybrid clones that come in a rainbow of bloom

colors and sizes. They are wonderful plants as they bloom almost

non-stop year round. We grow the standard species, as well as some of

the “Thai hybrids” that have larger, showier blooms. Links here, here, here and here.

Please look over the links and see if this is the plant you are

interested in.

Hap

Read More...
Read More...

Indoor Cactus


The <a href="https://cactusjungle.com/archives/blog/exit.php?url_id=1843&amp;entry_id=1658" title="http://www.venturacountystar.com/news/2008/jan/31/cactus-plants-can-thrive-in-office-setting/" onmouseover="window.status=’http://www.venturacountystar.com/news/2008/jan/31/cactus-plants-can-thrive-in-office-setting/’;return true;" onmouseout="window.status=”;return true;">Ventura County Star</a> says you can grow your cactus indoors, even though in Ventura County (CA) they would grow quite nicely outdoors. Except during the mudslides.<br /><br /><div style="margin-left: 40px;"><span style="font-style: italic;"><img width="400" hspace="5" border="2" src="/blog/uploads/misc/20080130-172332-pic-221376343_t600.jpg" /><br />Many small cacti produce enormous blossoms indoors. The Mamilaria clan, center, blooms in wreathlike garlands of tiny flowers. Gymnocalycium, right, often thrive in shade in the wild, but take on vivid coloring in the sun.</span><br /></div><br />I don’t really understand that caption to that photo, but then I’m not a journalist. That’s an Echinocereus bloom we’re looking at.<br /><br />

Read More...
Read More...

New Jersey Sports News


A little bit of extra super bowl news from the <a href="https://cactusjungle.com/archives/blog/exit.php?url_id=1836&amp;entry_id=1657" title="http://www.nj.com/sports/ledger/index.ssf?/base/sports-1/1201930505121520.xml&coll=1" onmouseover="window.status=’http://www.nj.com/sports/ledger/index.ssf?/base/sports-1/1201930505121520.xml&coll=1′;return true;" onmouseout="window.status=”;return true;">New Jersey Star- Ledger</a>.<br /><br /><div style="margin-left: 40px;"><span style="font-style: italic;"> CACTUS FACTUS<br />
<br />
The Fishhook Barrel Cactus can help (it’s often called the Compass Cactus because large plants tend to lean toward the southwest) and hurt (drinking the pulp water from the cactus can lead to diarrhea). The cactus usually grows 2 to 4 feet and often has an orange-ish flower when it blooms in late summer. </span><br /></div><br />OK. It’s strange what qualifies as sports news when the super bowl gets played in the desert.<br /><br />

Read More...
Read More...

Sissinghurst Cactus Dahlias


This is a mystery post. I don’t know what a cactus dahlia is, but they like them in London, as the <a href="https://cactusjungle.com/archives/blog/exit.php?url_id=1832&amp;entry_id=1656" title="http://www.telegraph.co.uk/gardening/main.jhtml?xml=/gardening/2008/02/02/garden-dahlia102.xml" onmouseover="window.status=’http://www.telegraph.co.uk/gardening/main.jhtml?xml=/gardening/2008/02/02/garden-dahlia102.xml’;return true;" onmouseout="window.status=”;return true;">Daily Telegraph</a> has a whole article about cactus dahlias at Sissinghurst.<br /><br /><div style="margin-left: 40px;"><span style="font-style: italic;">There are two very old dahlias in the coral-pink-orange range that I can recommend. The first is the cactus variety ‘Pontiac’. I first saw this in the bright and intensely colourful cottage garden at Sissinghurst and I’ve now grown and loved it for years.<br />
<br />
It has far fewer petals than most cactus dahlias and is all the nicer for it.</span><br /></div><br />I’ve done some research for you on this strange topic and found out that, &quot;<a href="https://cactusjungle.com/archives/blog/exit.php?url_id=1833&amp;entry_id=1656" title="http://www.ces.ncsu.edu/depts/hort/hil/hil-8500.html" onmouseover="window.status=’http://www.ces.ncsu.edu/depts/hort/hil/hil-8500.html’;return true;" onmouseout="window.status=”;return true;">Cactus dahlias</a> have somewhat tubular shaped petals that curve backwards for over one-half of their length.&quot; <br /><br />Alright, I still don’t understand. Is the word &quot;cactus&quot; just a modifier? Does it have any meaning? Let’s try <a href="https://cactusjungle.com/archives/blog/exit.php?url_id=1834&amp;entry_id=1656" title="http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Dahlia" onmouseover="window.status=’http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Dahlia’;return true;" onmouseout="window.status=”;return true;">wikipedia</a>.<br /><br /><div style="margin-left: 40px;"><span style="font-style: italic;">The American Dahlia Society recognizes 19 distinct bloom forms:<br />
<br />
<strong> Formal Decorative<br />
</strong> Informal Decorative<br />
<strong> Straight Cactus<br />
</strong> Semi Cactus<br />
* Incurved Cactus…</span><br /></div><br />Ahhh… it’s a label to distinguish certain elements of the dahlia blooms!<br /><br />
From <a href="https://cactusjungle.com/archives/blog/exit.php?url_id=1835&amp;entry_id=1656" title="http://www.sunnygardens.com/garden_plants/dahlia/dahlia_0953.php" onmouseover="window.status=’http://www.sunnygardens.com/garden_plants/dahlia/dahlia_0953.php’;return true;" onmouseout="window.status=”;return true;">Sunny Gardens</a> I’ve borrowed a photo:<br /><br /><img width="260" hspace="5" height="260" border="0" src="/blog/uploads/misc/0953.jpg" /><br /><br />Now we know what one looks like.<br /><br />

Read More...
Read More...
    
    
  Cactus and Succulents
  Bamboo
  Perennials
  Carnivorous Plants
  Airplants

  Sign up for our Monthly Newsletter

Categories

August 2019
MTWTFSS
« Jul  
 1234
567891011
12131415161718
19202122232425
262728293031 

US Constitution

Videos



We Get Questions

Email your questions to:

blog [at] cactusjungle [dot] com