Carrion Flowers

Hello!

I visited Cactus Jungle more than 2 years ago, and I picked up two plants: Orbea (Stapelia) variegata and Faucaria felina (I also picked up a bonus snail that has lived with O. variegata). The F. felina had a little accident a year ago (or rather, when I was in a 4-car collision on a highway while toting a few flats of plants to my new apartment, most of the plant’s growths were severed and it’s been languishing ever since), but the O. variegata is doing well. It isn’t as vibrantly colored as when I purchased it, but I also cannot give it the light it needs on a regular basis, so it makes do with what it can get. And that seems to be enough here in the swamp that is DC! These are the first blooms on this plant. Yeah, they stink, and I love them.
15039014797_aef09db5ae_o

I just wanted to share this photo with you!

Kenneth
———–
The Homestead Hobbyist
homesteadhobbyist.com

Click to embiggen!

Haworthia Question

Hi Peter,

Are you able to offer advice on Haworthias? I have a Haworthia chocolate pictured below that is losing leaves one by one. Not sure if it is going to stop or not, and if this is normal for a healthy C. chocolate. The dying leaves will turn a bright red color while losing their firmness, then became a pale red, and even more soft before drying up completely. Any thoughts?

photo 1

Attached here is a picture of the specimen with leaves showing this activity.

I’ve searched the internet for information, but haven’t been able to find much about it.

Thank you for all of your help and time here.

David

David,

Given the natural brown coloration it’s difficult to tell for sure, but I think that it is just losing bottom leaves, which is normal for succulents. Maybe it’s been a bit more water than it wants? Hard to say from the photo. In moderate direct sunlight you should water every 1 1/2 weeks through the summer and in lower light less than that.

Peter

Can You Help With a Cactus Identification?

Hey there, guys…
Sorry to bother you, but does the tagged specimen look like a positive id for Eriosyce occulta? The tag says that but it looks like more a copiapoa to me.

IMG_20140904_165227327

The untagged one looks like an eriosyce, too, perhaps?

IMG_20140904_174258978

Any help would be appreciated. Thanks again!
Joey

Joey,

It’s not a Copiapoa. It’s probably an Eriosyce that has been greenhouse grown. The spines at top are black, and you can look for a taproot when you replant it. Or wait until it flowers for a final ID. There are others it could be like a Coryphantha, but it would be a rare Coryphantha with black spines, so it is most likely the Eriosyce.

I don’t know the untagged one, but I don’t think it is E. occulta. I’ll post it to the blog, but you may have to wait until it flowers – send us a picture when it does!

Peter

Gas Lamp Conversion

light post succulents

Hap,

Thanks for your help this Saturday! we are thrilled with the result.

Best,
Michael

 

Plant ID Question from the Maritime Provinces

Nova Scotia calling. Hey guys, great website.

I wonder if you can identify this succulent a friend gave me. He got it in Italy and I am at a complete loss.

Halifax-20140808-02843

When he first sent a photo of it I thought it was an Aichryson or Aeonium.

When I got a piece I think maybe not, maybe an Echeveria hybrid???:

Hope you can help.

Will make a point to visit the nursery this winter.

Thanks

john

john,

That looks like a Sedum palmeri

Peter

Agave Love

Hello!

Love your website, can hardly wait to come into store!

We are trying to figure out what the plants are called surrounding the trees in the attached picture!

image

Do you carry these plants?

Thanks a lot,

Danielle

Danielle,

Those are Agave “Blue Glow” and we do carry them and have them in stock in a number of sizes!

Peter

Cactus in Paris

Hello Peter,
I was wondering if you could help me take care of my plants and maybe give me some advice! So as you can see I love plants, especially cacti and perennial plants. In every picture you can see that the soil is wet because I just watered them all today. Can you tell me how often each one needs to be watered?

I would also like to know whether they should be outdoors or not? I have a garden where I could put them but I would rather have them with me in my room. I recently put 6 and 7 outside but I am worried about that ‘burnt look’ they have going on now… Maybe the transition was a little too abrupt since they used to be inside. I never changed the soils, could you tell me if I should and how to?

Can you also tell me if they look healthy or if one of them needs special care? For the ones that stay in my room, I try to let as much sunshine in as I can, but I think maybe they would like to be outside. Also some parts of 7 died and I don’t know what to do with the remaining parts, does it mean that the whole cactus is going to die too?

I don’t know that much about cacti but I love them and would hate for them to die, so please help me! I’ve had the euphorbia 5 for a few years, I keep it inside the house and it looks really happy to me, it has grown a lot! Most of the others are new and I can’t tell if they have grown or not.

I live in Paris and it is rather hot and sunny during the summer and spring, but it can get really cold in the winter.

Also, if you know their names I would love to learn! THANK YOU so much, I LOVE your blog, I really hope you get a chance to reply and maybe help me.

1

2

3

4

5

6

7
Albertine

Albertine,

When you bring plants outside they need to be “hardened off” to the sun, which means bringing them slowly out into sunshine over the course of a week or longer, or they will get a sunburn.

All plants can be grown outside, it just depends on your local climate. Here in Berkeley or San Francisco we can grow those outside, but I am not sure in Paris. There is a cactus shop there that might know better for your particular locale.

The plants that I know are:

1. Euphorbia ferox

2. Don’t know

3. Opuntia microdasys

4. Ferocactus, too young to know the species

5. Euphorbia – could be trigona

6 and 7. Mammillaria

Generally you can water them every 2 to 3 weeks, but they look like they’re not getting a lot of sun, so maybe every 3 weeks is best.

Peter

ID a Plant

I was wondering if anyone may know what type of Echeveria this is, see attachment. It was about 6 inches across and standing about 4 inches up. Deep, dark red/brownish color and leaves were thick.

009

cindy

That would be Echeveria “Fireball”

Peter

San Francisco Succulents

Nina and Dexter send in this project they put together this weekend – a mixed succulents trough.

mixed succulents san francisco

Hi! Thanks for your help today! Hope our new friends thrive in San Francisco.
Nina and Dexter

Nice!

Can you name them all? I’ll give you a start: Aeonium, Sedum, Crassula, Echeveria, Aloe, Portulacaria and another Sedum.

Idaho Cactus

image

From my mother-in-law in Idaho comes a picture of some beautiful cactus in bloom; and a cousin made a cactus sculpture out of horseshoes.

Nice!

Aloes on Site

photo-1

Matt from San Anselmo shows us what he did with those Fan Aloes he got from us.

Aloe plicatilis sure can look modern.

Nice!

Blooming Cactus All Spring Long – Wow!

photo 2

I want to share a picture of my Echinopsis Sub. I purchased (9/2013) from your store per a staff recommendation. Last year there was only one bloom. This spring it went crazy with blooms!

Cynthia

photo 1

Texas Cactus Flowers

eller1

Cindy and Gene sent along these blooming cactus photos.

eller2

Out by Pontotoc, TX. Exploring the wilds and spotted these cactus in bloom. Made us think of you.

eller3

Terrestrial Bromeliads

Subject: Can you identify?

photo(2)

I bought this at your shop years ago, cannot remember name or type of plant. Can you help?

Karen

That is a lovely blooming Billbergia nutans, also known as the Queen’s Tears.

Nice!
Peter

Anne's Sarracenias

Anne sent along this photo of her Sarracenia collection.

Sarracenias

One of those has gotten HUGE!

Do you think she’ll be kind enough to add species names in the comments?

Finding Succulents

Hello Peter,

You were giving me some advice there at the nursery a few days ago about
possible choices of cacti and succulents for some planting that I’m hoping
to do here at my place in Kensington.

One of my neighbors has a succulent (I think)that I like very much. It’s
shown in this photo.

Echeveria Fireball

Can you identify it? Are these things available?

Your advice will be much appreciated!

Yours sincerely,

James

James,

That is an Echeveria “Fireball”, a very nice succulent. And we do not have any growing right now. We may have some by mid summer. We do have a lot of other Echeverias that are that big, even if not that red.

Peter

Agave Bloom Spikes in Berkeley

Dear Peter,

You may recall that I came in a few weeks ago with some photos of my Agave celsii, which had sent up 7 flower spikes. I was asking what to do now that the spikes were beginning to rot and you suggested taking the whole plant apart, which I did. I managed to rescue three pups, which are now planted and hopefully at least one of them will begin to replace the plant that is no more.

At the time, you asked me to send you some photos, for your blog. I am sorry to have taken so long to get around to this, but here they are.

A few months later, an A. paryii also bloomed – in some ways even more spectacular.

Thanks again for all your help.

Gail
Berkeley

Agaves in bloom - 02

And a lot of pictures were sent. Click through to see all of them. Read More…

Crested Donkey Tail Spurge

RoseAnn shares a wild looking cresting Euphorbia myrsinites.

euphorbia myrsinites crest

From the Euphorbia Spurge (I guess that’s the name) that I bought there.  pretty cool..

RoseAnn

euphorbia myrsinites crest closeup

Pretty cool, indeed.

Airplants

image

From our reader Genn comes this photo if Tillandsia, glass and candles. Nice!.

Actually Genn isn’t a Cactus Blog reader, she’s my mother-in-law! Nice!

Airplant Installation with Cactus

Devon sends along a photo of a Tillandsia arrangement, put together from stuff found here at the Cactus Jungle, and I would say that is a very nice use of the materials. This seems like a challenge to Rikki and Nicole.

airplants2

I’m giving my family all plant arrangements for Christmas, and for my sister I put together some air plants I got from you folks. I’m very pleased with how it turned out, so I’m sending you a couple pictures of the completed arrangement. The shell and glass stand are from you all as well. The plants are T. seleriana, T. harrisii, and T. juncea ‘red-green’. I think she’s going to like it!

We Get Questions

Hi Peter,

I hope you can help me out with an unusual repotting problem.

A well-meaning friend of ours recently sent us a “cactus garden” as a gift from an online website, pictured below:

IMG_2479

Any idea what the different species are? The online vendor simply labeled them all as “cacti”.

Well, the various cacti and succulents are doing fine so far, but now I think they are starting to crowd each other out. I was hoping to repot them, but the potting soil that they used is as hard as concrete! I can barely dent it with a hammer!

IMG_2483

Yes, it is that hard. I can’t even pull the wood chips out of the soil!

I have no idea what crazy concoction they are using as a soil. The directions that came with the garden only say that, “The cactus soil is a blend of nutrients combined with a hardening compound. It was scientifically developed to provide a healthy growing environment for cactus while also providing protection during shipment. Although it appears hard and impenetrable, the soil does absorb water and distributes it throughout the planter.”

Have you ever run into this strange potting medium before? If so, are the poor plants going to be okay in that stuff as they grow? And if not, what is the best way to get them out safely so that I can repot them?

Finally, it is currently winter here in southern California, and the cacti are sitting outside on our back porch. Should I wait until the spring growing season before attempting to repot them? And how much space should I give them?

Thank you for all your help!

Sincerely,
Jonathan

Jonathan,
You have 3 cacti and 3 succulents. This type of potting is not intended as a long term solution, so yes they do have to come out of the concrete (and they do add gypsum, i.e. concrete, to the mix to get it to harden). So basically you will be rescuing the plants.

If they are healthy now, I would wait until spring. If they look desperate, then go ahead and get them out now.

I don’t have any secrets for rescuing them – get the whole thing out of the pot and chisel them apart as best you can trying to save some roots where possible, but allowing for the fact that these may be cuttings you are starting with once they are out.

Pot them in dry fast-draining cactus soil, keep dry for a couple weeks. I would try a 4″ pot for each plant, if I am judging the size correctly.

Succulent Species:
Crassula ovata (Jade)
Faucaria felina (Tiger Jaws)
Pachyphytum, maybe longifolium

Cactus species:
Cleistocactus strausii
Mammillaria
Parodia

Peter

Succulent Wreaths

image

Robert sends along a photo of Lisa’s Thanksgiving table with our Succulent Wreaths for centerpieces, with red candles!

Succulent Terrarium

Heather got one of our more creative Succulent Terrariums recently and shared a shot of it in it’s new habitat, her bathroom, on instagram.

Succulent Terrarium

Nice! I like that you can see the backside of the terrarium in the mirror.

Living Walls

Hi there,

Attached are photos of the living wall we created using plants from your nursery. Thanks for being so helpful!

Living Wall

Best,
Josh and Deys

Wow! Nice job. Another picture of this Living Wall after the break. Read More…

Cactus ID

Peter,

Thanks again for reserving my ‘Ebony’

Please find attached the 2 cacti that I cannot ID without help. Let me know if I have something worth dividing, planting or tossing.

SAMSUNG  SAMSUNG

Thanks,

John

John,

The one with the smaller stems is Parodia leninghausii. This will have a lot of beautiful big yellow flowers. These can safely be divided and propagated in the spring.

The more sprawling one is probably an Echinopsis, but I wouldn’t be able to ID the species until it blooms. It’s probably easy to propagate from stem cuttings. Both look like they need to get out of the wood boxes and into something bigger. I would generally wait until March to repot these.

Peter

 

Cactus Care

Hi Peter,
We were wondering about these two cacti given to us by friends. The tall one on the left seems to want to branch (we got a cutting off a 3-4 foot tall potted specimen). The short guy we think is a gymnocalyceum, and have always been a bit puzzled by its odd coloration (kind of dayglo yellow and pink). It was potted in fine sand and really suffering when we got it 2 years ago. Not sure what either of their specific needs are (minimum tolerated temp, sun exposure, etc).

photo 2 photo 1

Thanks for your help!
Marion

Marion,

The tall one is a Cereus. The short one could be a Gymnocalycium, but I wouldn’t know for sure until it blooms. The coloration seems to be an effect of the sun and probably the soil too. It can handle less than full sun, and may need to be repotted into fresh fast draining cactus soil in the spring.

In the San Francisco area I would recommend watering every 2 to 3 weeks through the summer, less in winter. They are probably hardy down to about 30F.

Peter

Cactus Flower Identification Project

hi — i’m in northwest Wisconsin. wondering if you can identify a vine-type cactus, as far as I remember I got at a garage sale. Attached is a photo. I came home on my lunch hour today to take a photo of the single flower that had bloomed — good thing I did, cuz I just looked at it and the flower is drooped and lifeless. Evidently they only last a day?

cactus flower

I’ve had it about 4-5 years I think. It was root-bound so I divided it a few months ago. Some of the spikes are 3 feet long, long and narrow. There are others that are narrow, then form into a paddle, then get another narrow spike on the end. There are also rows of brown strings that form on the spikes, point toward the light. It’s in an east window.

Hope you can find the time to answer me.

Thanx —

Debbie A.

The cactus is an Epiphyllum, or Orchid Cactus. It is possible it is one of the night-blooming varieties – the blooms only last one night – although most epiphyllums will bloom during the day for 2-3 days. The brown strings are aerial roots – it is looking for tree branches to grab onto.

Peter

Categories

August 2019
MTWTFSS
« Jul  
 1234
567891011
12131415161718
19202122232425
262728293031 

US Constitution

Videos



We Get Questions

Email your questions to:

blog [at] cactusjungle [dot] com